Tuesday 11th December 2018

The steady demise of the gTLD: Sony follows lead of McDonalds, gives up .xperia

Sony has followed a number of organizations in abandoning its rights to administer a newly registered suffix (.xperia). It was also recently announced that the gTLD .mcdonalds was removed from the internet's domain name space.
Jason Smith
by on 31st July 2018

Another domain extension has disappeared overnight.

The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA), a division of The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), has posted an update to its root database that signifies the .xperia top-level domain, which was previously assigned for administration by Sony in 2015, is no longer open to registrations.

In a letter addressed to IANA, Sony states that its termination of the agreement will become effective as of 1st August, 2018.

It is one of a number of organizations that have recently abandoned generic top-level domains (gTLDs); others include McDonalds (.mcdonalds), HTC (.htc) and Richemont DNS (.chloe).

In 2012, ICANN, the organization tasked with administering the internet’s domain name space, relaxed restrictions placed on the registration of new top-level domains.

The rule change prompted a land rush from organizations eager to acquire the best extensions. Many organizations, like Sony and McDonalds, also seemingly believed the rule change created up a unique branding opportunity.

Under the new rules, organizations that wish to register suffixes become domain registries for that suffix. They must also go through a lengthy application process and pay ICANN $185,000 for the rights to administer the suffix.

According to the latest Domain Name Industry Brief from Verisign, there are 20.2 million gTLD registrations and 146.3 million .com and .net registrations.

While .com and .net registrations have increased 2.2 percent year-on-year, gTLD registrations decreased 20.7 percent over the same time frame.

Despite this, there are still thousands of pending applications for new suffixes. According to the applications listed on ICANN’s website, Amazon is particularly active in the process of attempting to secure the right to administer new suffixes and has pending applications for extensions including .coupon, .talk, .smile, .wow, .read, .play and .news.

Overall, it’s currently attempting to register, or has registered, at least 76 new suffixes.